How to Work With a Virtual Business Manager

In the computer-frenzied world we live in, people tend to be dependent on the web and managing a business is not an exemption. That is the very reason virtual business managers are out in the market today.Virtual business management is a software that has an interactive, multiplayer-capable simulation which teaches introduction to business, entrepreneurship, management, and supervision. As entrepreneurs starting their own business, your students will find a location for their business, choose a form of ownership, hire and supervise employees, find and keep customers, use insurance to manage risk, and challenge them to read resumes critically and choose the best people for their business. Keep your students totally engaged with management challenges such as labor shortages strikes, problem employees, and industrial accidents. Virtual business managers give you all that and more!Virtual business managers work just like some of the games you find on the net. It takes the classroom engagement to the next level and is played with two multiplayer modes, the role-based and the competitive modes. Role-based modes require students to work with each other from different computers. They take different roles and work together for the success of the business. On the other hand, competitive modes require teams to compete against each other as to whose business gains more wealth than the other.Virtual business management is easy to use even for newbies. Its interface, lesson structure, and advancing levels are made with new users in mind so that they won’t find a hard time incorporating with the software. There are assessment options that allow users to generate quizzes with random questions based on selected lessons. More than that, virtual business management also allows its users to print out worksheets, projects, and performance journals to make it easier for the teacher to assess the performance of his students.When you avail of a virtual business management software, you will get a CD for you to be able to install it on your computers. Along with it is its introductory DVD with all the training know-how’s in it to help you learn faster even on your own. It also has interactive tutorials for your students plus instructor’s manual with the lesson plans and answer keys for classroom discussions and activities. You also get to have a full poster to be posted in your classrooms for visuals. There may also be optional assessment CDs to help you more with your discussions. Now who says interactive gaming is only for computer addicts? There are those that help you with your business without making you feel the pressure. Virtual business managers give you just that.

Small Business Management: Let the Games Begin

When you were a kid your favorite way to learn things was probably by playing games. If you are a parent, you might still be teaching by playing games. When I first read Jack Stacks Great Game of Business, I thought, “Damn, that is great for business coaching and consulting.”If you want to teach different types of business and financial concepts, a game with real prices on the table is an excellent way to do this. There is only one really important rule you’ve got to remember about setting up a game, which is you never pit people against each other. Not even teams. You want your whole organization to be working together toward a goal-and getting the goal is winning. Therefore, use people’s innate desire to win and be competitive, but make sure that it’s not against each other.Here are a couple of samples of some games that I’ve seen played and been a part of:1. Needed Cash – The Revenue GameGet everybody on the team thinking about getting revenue and understanding the difference between billing and cash. You can set the game up to earn $100,000 in thirty days together and the team gets 10% of it. If you are a small retail establishment playing this game, this is a considerable amount of money-you’ll get their attention. The team will have to work together and come up with new solutions about how they are going to find that extra $100,000:
If there is money sitting in receivables, make an effort to collect the money.

Create new sales opportunities by re-bundling popular services and products together.

Create in-store contests to bring more people in.
Trust me; your team will learn a lot about cash flow.2. The Billable Hours GameWhen billable hours are the law of the land, it is very expensive when any of your employees are not billing hours. If your average billable hour is around 50%, but you need to get up to 85%, for example, then this is the game for.Over a 90 day period, the entire team is challenged to move from 50% billable hours, or wherever they were, to an average of 85% billable hours across the board. After the 90-day period the gains are split 50/50.
Your team will need to really talk about productivity on all levels.

Your team will have to look at personal time management.

Your team will have to look at what is going to serve the customer and create the billable hours.
In your situation, you might need to extend the game to 120 days to suit your needs, but the neat thing about a game like this is that once you do it, you know that you can. There is no turning back.3. The Sales GameAre your sales down? Let’s say you need sales to come up by 20%. If your team can achieve the 20% gain in 90 days, you would split the gain with them, not unlike the Billable Hours game.This game encourages people to think outside their box to create new things that will push up totals by 20%.
What kind of game do you need to play in your business?

What issue is happening that you want to solve?

Are expenses too high?

Do you want to bring down your costs of manufacturing?

Do you want to look for productivity or innovation in your business?
There is a game to be had around all of those. And the beautiful thing that happens with games is it makes everybody think on their feet in a new way. If done well, everyone, including the company, is a winner.

Small Business Management: Let the Games Begin

When you were a kid your favorite way to learn things was probably by playing games. If you are a parent, you might still be teaching by playing games. When I first read Jack Stacks Great Game of Business, I thought, “Damn, that is great for business coaching and consulting.”If you want to teach different types of business and financial concepts, a game with real prices on the table is an excellent way to do this. There is only one really important rule you’ve got to remember about setting up a game, which is you never pit people against each other. Not even teams. You want your whole organization to be working together toward a goal-and getting the goal is winning. Therefore, use people’s innate desire to win and be competitive, but make sure that it’s not against each other.Here are a couple of samples of some games that I’ve seen played and been a part of:1. Needed Cash – The Revenue GameGet everybody on the team thinking about getting revenue and understanding the difference between billing and cash. You can set the game up to earn $100,000 in thirty days together and the team gets 10% of it. If you are a small retail establishment playing this game, this is a considerable amount of money-you’ll get their attention. The team will have to work together and come up with new solutions about how they are going to find that extra $100,000:
If there is money sitting in receivables, make an effort to collect the money.

Create new sales opportunities by re-bundling popular services and products together.

Create in-store contests to bring more people in.
Trust me; your team will learn a lot about cash flow.2. The Billable Hours GameWhen billable hours are the law of the land, it is very expensive when any of your employees are not billing hours. If your average billable hour is around 50%, but you need to get up to 85%, for example, then this is the game for.Over a 90 day period, the entire team is challenged to move from 50% billable hours, or wherever they were, to an average of 85% billable hours across the board. After the 90-day period the gains are split 50/50.
Your team will need to really talk about productivity on all levels.

Your team will have to look at personal time management.

Your team will have to look at what is going to serve the customer and create the billable hours.
In your situation, you might need to extend the game to 120 days to suit your needs, but the neat thing about a game like this is that once you do it, you know that you can. There is no turning back.3. The Sales GameAre your sales down? Let’s say you need sales to come up by 20%. If your team can achieve the 20% gain in 90 days, you would split the gain with them, not unlike the Billable Hours game.This game encourages people to think outside their box to create new things that will push up totals by 20%.
What kind of game do you need to play in your business?

What issue is happening that you want to solve?

Are expenses too high?

Do you want to bring down your costs of manufacturing?

Do you want to look for productivity or innovation in your business?
There is a game to be had around all of those. And the beautiful thing that happens with games is it makes everybody think on their feet in a new way. If done well, everyone, including the company, is a winner.